We operate a 24 hour emergency service
Woodbridge: 01394 380083 Felixstowe: 01394 284554 Rendlesham: 01394 420964 Ipswich: 01473 274040
We operate a 24 hour emergency service
Woodbridge: 01394 380083
Felixstowe: 01394 284554
Rendlesham: 01394 420964
Ipswich: 01473 274040

Young birds – Do they need our help?

Spring time means fledgling time!

Not only do we have our brown landscapes evolving into luscious green fields and beautiful flowers blossoming, we also have our wildlife creating their own new life, especially our birds who have now started nesting.

Among us there are many little creatures starting out in the world, most of which know exactly what they are doing, although a small percentage need a helping hand.
It is important to know when wildlife need help, as offering it when they do not can have a negative impact.

Most commonly, it is young birds that are affected. This is because fledglings found on their own are often thought to be in danger. It is normal for fledglings to be on their own, as this is the stage in their life in which they are learning to adapt and survive to their surroundings and building up the courage to perfect their flying ability. More often than not, the parents are close by and watching over these fledglings or out gathering food. It is important fledglings are left to continue their life training, as removing them from the wild should be the very last resort.

Only when they are visibly injured or have remained in the same area for over two days, should interfering be appropriate.

In cases where interference is required, handling should be kept to a minimum and they should be placed in a dark box, with ventilation to reduce stress as much as possible. These fledgling(s) should be left alone and taken to an appropriate establishment, such as a Veterinary Practice, a Wildlife Centre or the RSPCA, as soon as possible for the best chance of survival.

Nature is far better at caring for these fragile little birds compared to the less experienced, but well intended care of us humans. So please think carefully before removing a fledgling from the wild as it is not always the best option.